Characterization of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

Pelvic organ prolapse | The BMJ

Pelvic organ prolapse happens when the muscles and tissues supporting the pelvic organs (the uterus, bladder, or rectum) become weak or loose. This allows one or more of the pelvic organs to drop or press into or out of the vagina. Many women are embarrassed to talk to their doctor about their symptoms or think that their symptoms are normal. But pelvic organ prolapse is treatable.

References

D.J. Lawrence, C.L. Bayer. “Photoacoustic imaging provides an in vivo assessment of the preeclamptic placenta remodeling and function in response to therapy”.  Placenta 126, 46-53 (2022).

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Bayer, CL, Modeling Longitudinal Placental Perfusion using Molecularly Targeted Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound. 16th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering and 4th Conference on Imaging and Visualization. New York, New York. August 16, 2019.

D.J. Lawrence, K. Huda, and C.L. Bayer, “Longitudinal characterization of local perfusion of the rat placenta using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging,” Interface Focus, vol 9, no. 5, 2019.

[DOI]

Bayer, CL, Spectral Photoacoustic Imaging of Placental Function, Current Trends in Pre-Clinical Photoacoustic Imaging of Small Animals Workshop, SPIE Medical Imaging, San Diego, CA, February 19, 2019.

D.J. Lawrence, M.E. Escott, L. Myers, S. Intapad, S.H. Lindsey, and C.L. Bayer, “Spectral photoacoustic imaging to estimate in vivo placental oxygenation during preeclampsia,” Scientific Reports, vol. 9, no. 1, 2019.

[DOI]

Bayer CL, Photoacoustic Imaging of Preeclamptic Placental Function, American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Annual Convention, New York, New York. March 26, 2018.

Lawrence, DJ, Escott, ME, Bayer, CL, “Photoacoustic imaging of placental ischemia during preeclampsia”, Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, Phoenix, AZ, October 13, 2017.